Exhibition
February 14–April 7, 2017

Elaine Byrne: women boxed

Opening Reception: Tuesday, February 14, 6–8pm

The International Studio & Curatorial Program announces the opening of women boxed, an exhibition of work by Ground Floor artist Elaine Byrne in ISCP’s Project Space. women boxed is a three-channel video installation that invites dialogue about how women’s labor is viewed in society, using the magic trick of sawing a woman in half as a pivotal metaphor.

Byrne observes, “The world of magic has been dominated by men, where the magician actively drives the story and the female assistant functions as a spectacle for the male gaze. The magician’s assistant brings the action to a stop and captures the spectators’ attentionshe freezes the flow of events for moments of erotic contemplation.” Evoking ever-present gender inequality, the female assistant plays the role of victim. She is a woman literally encased in a box, seeming to await her fate. In actuality, the female assistant is largely responsible for the success of the trick, but her labor is hardly recognized. One of Byrne’s three videos was recently filmed on location at the Houdini Museum in Scranton, Pennsylvania, where the artist filmed the renowned female magician, Dorothy Dietrich. The first woman to saw a man in half, Dietrich speaks about her role as a female magician in a male-dominated industry. At a time when women continue fighting for many freedoms and equalities all over the world, women boxed alludes to these struggles through the arena of magic and illusion.

Elaine Byrne (born in Ireland and currently based in New York) examines overlooked histories, historical texts and artworks as a platform to mobilize history relating to current social concerns. Byrne received her BA from University College of Dublin, and her MA in Visual Arts Practices from IADT, Dublin (2009). She completed the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program (2015). She has had solo shows at Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Dublin; Montoro12, Rome; Limerick City Gallery; Oonagh Young Gallery, Dublin; and Atrio Cultura Space, Mexico. She was the winner of the 8th Arte Laguna sculpture prize (2014) and T.I.N.A. prize (2015). Her work is in permanent collections including: the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Rosenbach Museum and Library, Pennsylvania; Office of Public Works, Ireland; The Department of Foreign Affairs, Ireland; and PWC, London, England. She is represented by the Kevin Kavanagh Gallery, Dublin, Ireland.

This exhibition is coordinated by Alexandra Friedman, Program Coordinator, ISCP.

This program is supported, in part, by Greenwich Collection Ltd., New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.
Opening Reception: Feb 14, 2017, 6–8pm
Open Hours: Tuesday–Friday, 12–6pm
Download Press Release

Participating Residents

ISCP Talk
February 2, 2017, 6:30–8pm​

Fran Ilich and Juliana Cope in conversation

Artist Fran Ilich will speak about his current ​public ​project Aridoamérica: Winter Plan, within the larger context of his practice. Commissioned by ISCP, Aridoamérica is currently on view at El Museo de Los Sures​. Ilich will converse with project curator Juliana Cope, followed by Q&A and reception.​

Fran Ilich (born 1975 in Tijuana, Mexico) is a media artist, essayist and novelist based in New York City. He has participated in ARCO, Madrid; Berlinale Talent Campus; Documenta 12, Kassel; Transmediale, Berlin; How Latitudes Become Forms, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and the Festival Mundial de la Digna Rabia, Mexico City.

El Museo de Los Sures was born from a partnership between Southside United with Cornell University and Churches United for Fair Housing to preserve the history of the neighborhood’s residents.

This project is the eighth collaboration between Los Sures and ISCP. It is made possible in part, by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo; the New York State Legislature; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and Antonio Reynoso, Council Member, 34th District; and The Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation.

Location: El Museo de Los Sures, 120 South 1st Street, Brooklyn, NY 11249

This program is supported, in part, by New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.
6:30–8pm​

ISCP Talk
January 24, 2017, 6:30–8pm

Lecture by Shimabuku and exhibition catalog launch

In conjunction with ISCP’s exhibition The Animal Mirror, Japanese artist Shimabuku will discuss his recent work. Shimabuku has explored the role of communication, memory, and travel in the construction of both animal and human consciousness. His work often involves encounters with live animals. From 1990 to 2013 he made a series of works involving octopuses, including a film documenting his tour of famous sites in Tokyo with a live octopus. For his work in The Animal Mirror, he produced an exhibition for a group of Japanese macaque monkeys in Kyoto.

Shimabuku’s recent solo exhibitions include Exchange a mobile phone for a stone tool at Wilkinson Gallery, London (2015) and When Sky was Sea at Vancouver Contemporary Art Gallery (2014). His work is represented in the collections of the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Kunsthalle Bern; and the National Museum of Art, Osaka, among others.

After the lecture, ISCP will launch the exhibition catalog, Aqueous Earth & The Animal Mirror, which combines documentation, images, and supporting texts from two recent exhibitions at ISCP: Aqueous Earth (October 21, 2015 – January 22, 2016) and The Animal Mirror (November 2, 2016 – January 27, 2017). The catalog includes contributions by Kari Conte, Jacques Derrida, Simone Forti, Dylan Gauthier, Terike Haapoja, and Timothy Morton.

Bringing together a diverse group of international artists, this pair of exhibitions engages recent challenges to anthropocentric perspectives—the looming ecological crises of the Anthropocene in Aqueous Earth and our increasing understanding of the complexity of non-human animals in The Animal Mirror—to explore art’s centrality in understanding and negotiating these shifts and their effects on human culture and society.

This event is generously supported by The Japan Foundation, New York.

Aqueous Earth & The Animal Mirror is supported, in part, by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Greenwich Collection Ltd. ,The Japan Foundation, New York, Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen e. V., New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, the New York State Legislature, and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

This program is supported, in part, by New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.
6:30–8pm