ISCP Talk
January 23, 2018, 6:30–8pm

belit sağ, Tomáš Rafa and Siddhartha Mitter on Concrete Truth: Art and the Documentary

This event, held in conjunction with the exhibition Concrete Truth: Art and the Documentary, will begin with a screening of New Nationalism in the Heart of Europe by Tomáš Rafa, who has invited Siddhartha Mitter to respond to this work, followed by a screening and introduction of disruption (aksama) by belit sağ.

Siddhartha Mitter works on arts and culture, creative communities, cities, and political and economic issues, mostly in the United States and West Africa. He is a regular contributor to the Village Voice (since 2016) and Boston Globe (since 2004). Previous outlets for his work include Al Jazeera America, The Atlantic, BL Ink (India), Daily Beast, MTV, The National (UAE), The New Yorker, Paste, The Oxford American, and Transition. Mitter attended Harvard University for both undergraduate and graduate school. He is trained in political economy of development, with an emphasis on West Africa. Mitter lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Tomáš Rafa’s creative areas include reportage videos (such as New Nationalism in the Heart of Europe, ongoing since 2009), which reflect the problems of new nationalism in Central Europe, and projects including (Eg in Michalovce, Sečovce, Veľká Ida and Ostrovany), through which he attempts to eliminate some of the barriers between the Roma community and the majority population in Eastern Slovakia. The common denominator in Rafa’s participatory reportage videos and realizations are social and political engagement and activism. Rafa won the Oskar Čepan Prize in 2011, and recently had a solo exhibition at MoMA PS1, New York.

belit sağ is a visual artist with a video background in video-activist groups in Turkey. Her work was presented at MOCA, Taipei; Tabakalera, San Sebastian; EYE, Amsterdam; the Toronto, Rotterdam and New York International Film Festivals; and documenta 14, Kassel. She was a resident at the Rijksakademie, Amsterdam and ISCP, New York.

This program is supported, in part, by Greenwich Collection, Ltd., National Endowment for the Arts, New York City Council District 34; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

 

6:30–8pm

Participating Residents

Event
December 19, 2017, 6:30–8pm

Salon: Søren Thilo Funder and Christian Falsnaes

Søren Thilo Funder will present recent works, highlighting notions of authoritative and collective history writing. Working with narrative constructions that negotiate between fiction and reality, references to history and recollection appear throughout Funder’s work.

Christian Falsnaes will speak about the role of audience participation in his work. Falsnaes employs a multitude of visual forms, including painting, video, music and dance, to develop situations with the active participation of the audience. Recurrent themes are the relations between the individual and the group, and those between the artist and his audience.

This program is supported, in part, by The Beckett Foundation, Danish Arts Foundation, Den Hielmstierne-Rosencroneske Stiftelse, Knud Højgaards Fond, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council, and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

6:30–8pm

Current and Upcoming Events & Exhibitions

ISCP Talk
December 12, 2017, 6:30–8pm

Ethics, Documentary, and the Internet: Paolo Cirio in conversation with Julia Powles

This conversation between Paolo Cirio and Julia Powles for the exhibition Concrete Truth: Art and the Documentary will explore how free speech can be reconciled with the right to a dignified image of vulnerable individuals, both on the internet and in the field of art. Cirio’s project Obscurity, featured in Concrete Truth, will act as a case study to discuss what the artist calls “the ethics of representation as well as the aesthetics of ethics.” Obscurity obfuscates over ten million internet mugshots and criminal records for the “Right to Be Forgotten Law” being proposed in the United States.

Paolo Cirio engages with legal, economic, and semiotic systems of the information society. His works investigate social fields impacted by the internet, such as privacy, copyright, democracy, and finance. In 2017, Cirio’s artworks have been presented and exhibited in art institutions including MIT Museum, Boston; Tate Modern, London; C/O Berlin; Museum für Fotografie, Berlin; Münchner Stadtmuseum; Musée National d’Histoire et d’Art of Luxembourg; and Haifa Museum of Art. He has won a number of awards, including the Golden Nica first prize at Ars Electronica in Linz and the Transmediale second prize in Berlin.

Dr. Julia Powles is a research fellow at New York University School of Law and Cornell Tech, where she works on the law and politics of technology. Prior to coming to New York, Powles was a postdoctoral fellow in law and computer science at the University of Cambridge, a policy fellow and contributing editor at The Guardian newspaper, and speechwriter for the Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organization. She has worked as a lawyer, scientific researcher, and clerked in the Federal Court of Australia and Commonwealth Administrative Appeal Tribunal, working on technology, intellectual property, and national security cases.

This program is supported, in part, by Greenwich Collection, Ltd., National Endowment for the Arts, New York City Council District 34; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

6:30–8pm

Participating Residents