Exhibition
Through May 27

Sharon Norwood's Drawing Room

Sharon Norwood’s Drawing Room is the first solo exhibition in New York by artist Sharon Norwood, curated by Dr. Petrina Dacres, ISCP’s 2022 Jane Farver Memorial Fund resident.

Norwood works with several media including painting, printmaking and ceramic. Drawing inspiration from the shape of Black hair, her work’s starting point is often a curly line. In her abstract prints and paintings, she intertwines organic lines to act as gestural markings; in her ceramic sculptures and installations, the curly line surfaces in interwoven geometric shapes. Norwood’s formal gestures symbolically reference the Black body and its relationship to politics of labor, beauty and race. 

In this exhibition, Norwood uses her own hair as material for the first time. A wall installation features two cast statuettes of African American boys, connected by a silver chain necklace. Norwood’s hair is encased in a resin ring on a gold necklace that hangs from the arm of one of the figures. The figures’ molds were found by the artist in Savannah, Georgia, leading Norwood to conclude that there was once an industry of Black craftsmakers who sold their decorative objects to a largely African American community. The minimal and intimate work in the exhibition offers recognition of an unacknowledged history of Black artisans in the United States, and connects Norwood’s own experience as an artist and maker of objects to that tradition.

Sharon Norwood is originally from Jamaica and migrated to Canada as a child. She creates works that exploit the decorative intentions and joy of mark-making and gesturing, disrupt the White gaze and other passive notions of viewing “the other,” and question standing narratives and systems that shape how identities are understood. In recent years, she has explored the intersection of the Black body and decorative arts by translating her drawings onto porcelain objects. Norwood has participated in a number of residencies and fellowships including at McColl Center, Charlotte, North Carolina, and Hambidge Center, Georgia. She has exhibited work at The Museum of Washington and Lee University, Lexington; Mindy Solomon Gallery, Miami; and Tempus Projects, Tampa, among others.

Dr. Petrina Dacres is an independent curator and founding member of Tide Rising Art Projects, an organization created to support and promote contemporary Caribbean art and film, where she serves as its resident Curator and Education Director. Her work and research focus on Caribbean art; African diaspora art; public sculpture and memorials; and memory studies. Dr. Dacres has organized exhibitions at Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural & Educational Center, New York; The National Museum, Jamaica, Kingston; and National Gallery of Jamaica, Kingston, among others. She is Head of the Art History Department at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in Kingston, Jamaica, and the 2022 Jane Farver Curatorial Resident at ISCP.

Sharon Norwood’s Drawing Room is supported in part by Jane Farver Memorial Fund; Hartfield Foundation; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; New York City Council District 34; New York State Council on the Arts and the New York State Legislature; and William Talbott Hillman Foundation.

By visiting ISCP, you agree to abide by the following health and safety policies. Please make sure to plan ahead for your visit.
  • Four visitors are allowed in the galleries at a time, and appointments are required. Please write to info@iscp-nyc.org to schedule an appointment.
  • All visitors are required to maintain social distancing, keeping six feet from anyone not in their party.
  • Masks or face coverings are strongly recommended but not mandatory.
  • Hand sanitizer will be available for visitors.
  • If you have fever, chills, cough, muscle pains, headache, loss of taste or smell, or think you may have been exposed to COVID-19 prior to your visit, please contact us to reschedule.
  • An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 and other infectious conditions exists in any public space where people are present. Those visiting the International Studio & Curatorial Program voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19, other infectious conditions, and other hazards that may be present in a public space.
Opening Reception: Mar 24, 2022, 6-8pm
Open Hours: By appointment Monday–Friday, 10:30am–5:30pm.
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Participating Residents

ISCP Talk
March 22, 2022, 6-7:30pm

Ferguson Amo and Tere Garcia in Conversation with Alison Kuo

For this in-person event, two United States-based artists will give presentations about what they worked on during their time in studios and engage each other in a conversation. Ferguson Amo and Tere Garcia who were a part of ISCP’s 2022 Vision Fund residency, will be joined by Arts Residency Manager Alison Kuo. A Q&A with the audience will follow.

Register here to RSVP. Spaces are limited and proof of COVID-19 vaccination is required for entry.

Ferguson Amo works across various mediums, including hyper realistic drawings, installations, and mixed media. Originally from Koforidua, Ghana, the artist explores contemporary African identity in the diaspora and examines the intricate details of history and experiences of cultural diffusion, and its assimilation, through representation. Through each work, Amo asks “how as an audience, can we move the image of black bodies and ‘blackness’ toward emancipation?” Amo has exhibited work at VisArts, Rockville; Kente Royal Gallery and The Immigrant Artist Biennial, both New York City, among others.

Tere Garcia is a multidisciplinary artist working across photography, performance, video, and installation. Her art practice has been an important tool to express, heal, and form narratives about her identity and the places where she exists. Garcia has been traveling and working along the United States and Mexico Border, confronting these boundaries that demolish and hinder unity. Garcia has exhibited work at Northern Illinois University Art Museum, DeKalb; Lawndale Art Center and Station Museum of Contemporary Art, both Houston, among others.

By visiting ISCP, you agree to abide by the following health and safety policies. Please make sure to plan ahead for your visit.
  • Visitors to ISCP are required to show proof of vaccination for COIVD-19 and to wear face coverings at all times.
  • All visitors are required to maintain social distancing, keeping six feet from anyone not in their party.
  • Hand sanitizer will be available for visitors.
  • If you have fever, chills, cough, muscle pains, headache, loss of taste or smell, or think you may have been exposed to COVID-19 prior to your visit, please contact us to reschedule.
  • An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 and other infectious conditions exists in any public space where people are present. Those visiting the International Studio & Curatorial Program voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19, other infectious conditions, and other hazards that may be present in a public space.

This program is supported, in part, by Hartfield Foundation; National Endowment for the Arts; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; New York City Council District 34; New York State Council on the Arts and the New York State Legislature; Toby Devan Lewis; William Talbott Hillman Foundation; and Woodbury Foundation.

6-7:30pm
RSVP

Participating Residents

ISCP Talk
February 25, 2022, 4–5pm

'Bursting Bubbles' Film Premiere: Director Maliyamungu Gift Muhande Interviews Adjani Okpu-Egbe

For the premiere of the short film Bursting Bubbles, filmmaker and current artist-in-residence Maliyamungu Gift Muhande will interview Adjani Okpu-Egbe, who is also an artist-in-residence at ISCP, and the main subject of the film. 

Hailing from differing African contexts and generations, these two activist thinkers will talk about solidarity and current events, including the 2022 Africa Cup of Nations soccer tournament hosted in Cameroon. They will also compare and contrast their personal and professional experiences at home and abroad, within the contemporary art field and beyond. 

Register here to RSVP. Spaces are limited and proof of COVID-19 vaccination is required for entry.

Adjani Okpu-Egbe is a London-based multidisciplinary artist who uses mixed media, including found objects, to make works that shed light on socio-political and economic issues affecting Africa, its diaspora and reflecting on global social justice. His first solo show in the United States, On Delegitimization and Solidarity: Sisiku AyukTabe, the Martin Luther King Jr. of Ambazonia, the Nera 10, and the Myth of Violent Africa, curated by Amy Rosenblum-Martín, is currently on view at ISCP. Okpu-Egbe has exhibited work at Kunstverein Braunschweig Museum, Germany, SAVVY Contemporary, Berlin, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel, Kunstpalast Museum, Düsseldorf, among many others.

Maliyamungu Gift Muhande is a Congolese documentary filmmaker and artist whose work explores the global history of the Black diaspora at the crossroads of anti-colonial change and personal creativity. Her work has presented work at the 2022 Sundance Film Festival, Salt Lake City; black beyond, New York; and Art Island, New York, among others.

This event is supported by Colleen Ritzau Leth; Evelyn Toll Family Foundation; Hartfield Foundation; Johnson Picture Framing & Galleries; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; New York City Council District 34; New York City Council District 33; New York State Council on the Arts and the New York State Legislature; Tauck Ritzau Innovative Philanthropy; and William Talbott Hillman Foundation.

4–5pm
RSVP