Exhibition
Through July 21

Vibe Overgaard: Spindle City

The International Studio & Curatorial Program presents Spindle City, a solo exhibition of work by Vibe Overgaard, curated by Media Farzin. Spindle City takes the textile industry as a context from which to examine the workings and impact of growth economies. It is based on the artist’s research in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and Lowell, Massachusetts, major hubs of industrial cotton production in the United States, and draws on the artist’s background growing up in a Danish town founded as a manufacturing center for textiles. 

The exhibition features a video essay, Spindle City, and a series of sculptures made of ceramic, wood, metal, and thread. The circuit is a recurring motif: from the fiber that winds through sculptures that evoke industrial looms, to the animated lines of the video, which symbolically trace a critical path through legacies of capitalism, colonialism, slavery, and the welfare state. 

In the artist’s words, “this series investigates and questions the legacy of industrialization, especially the Western mindset that worships the machine and lets nothing stand in the way of economic growth. It asks us to imagine ways of balancing technological development with a deeper attention to nature and our own capacity for sensitivity.”

Exhibition curator Media Farzin states, Spindle City grounds us within the vistas and systems we have inherited from industrial capitalism. It proposes small-scale gestures of agency and responsibility within these received forms. It gestures towards a more thoughtful understanding of global citizenship, social forms organized around the mutual needs of human bodies, communities, and ecologies.”

Public programs will be announced on ISCP’s website and newsflashes.

Vibe Overgaard is a Danish visual artist working broadly with installation, sculpture, performance, video, archive material and critical writing. Her research-based practice focuses on economies seen from a historical perspective. Often researching industry and production relations of a specific location, her work links local circumstances to greater global-political questions and critiques. She has exhibited work at Kunsthal NORD, Aalborg, Denmark; Goethe Institut, Ramallah, Palestine; and Floating Projects, Hong Kong, among others. She was an ISCP artist-in-residence in 2022 and 2023 supported by the Danish Arts Foundation.

Media Farzin is a New York-based writer and art historian. She received her BFA in Painting from Tehran University, an MA in Curatorial Studies from Columbia University, and a PhD from the City University of New York. She was curator of Nicky Nodjoumi: Fractures, The Third Line, Dubai; Turning Points, Neiman Gallery, New York; and Fluxus Scores and Instructions, Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde, Denmark. Her project with artist Alessandro Balteo Yazbeck was shown at the 12th Istanbul Biennial and later at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Her writings have appeared in Art Agenda, Artforum, Bidoun, Frieze, and Modern Painters, among others. She is a faculty member at the School of Visual Arts and is Publications Director at Happy Family Night Market.

This exhibition is supported, in part, by Consulate General of Denmark in New York; Danish Arts Foundation; Hartfield Foundation; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; New York State Council on the Arts and the New York State Legislature; and William Talbott Hillman Foundation.

By visiting ISCP, you agree to abide by the following health and safety policies. Please make sure to plan ahead for your visit.

  • Groups of four or more are required to schedule an appointment in advance. Please write to info@iscp-nyc.org
  • All visitors are encouraged to maintain social distancing while at ISCP.
  • Masks or face coverings are strongly recommended but not mandatory.
  • Hand sanitizer will be available for visitors.
  • If you have fever, chills, cough, muscle pains, headache, loss of taste or smell, or think you may have been exposed to COVID-19 prior to your visit, please contact us to reschedule.
  • An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 and other infectious conditions exists in any public space where people are present. Those visiting the International Studio & Curatorial Program voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19, other infectious conditions, and other hazards that may be present in a public space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open Hours: Open Hours: Monday–Friday, 10:30am–5:30pm
Download Press Release (PDF)

Participating Residents

ISCP Talk
March 14, 2023, 6–7pm

Artists at Work: Aideen Barry and Kokou Ferdinand Makouvia

For this Artists at Work, current ISCP residents Aideen Barry and Kokou Ferdinand Makouvia will give presentations on their respective artistic practices and engage each other and the audience in a conversation. They will be joined by Director of Programs Alison Kuo. 

Additionally, each artist will offer a prompt to the audience meant to provoke an open discussion. Makouvia will focus on the “beingness of the object,” inquiring how people relate to the essential material nature of art works. Barry, who often collaborates with other visual artists and musicians, will ask “What if we are the last of the artists?”

Aideen Barry is a multidisciplinary artist from Ireland whose modes of expression include performance, moving image, and sculptural manifestations. Using visual tricks to intensify the suspension of reality, Barry explores subjects such as domestic labor, examinations of class, otherness, environmental change, and human vulnerability. She has exhibited work at the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; Katzen Center at American University Museum, Washington D.C.; and Centro de Arte Contemporáneo de Málaga, Málaga, among others.

Kokou Ferdinand Makouvia is a sculptor and performance artist from Togo, living and working in France. In his practice, Makouvia explores the relationship between matter and human beings, emphasizing the energy that underlies material expression. He has exhibited work at Galerie Sator, Paris; De Ateliers, Amsterdam; and Musée de la Céramique, Normandy, among others.

This program is supported, in part, by Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, Dublin; La Fondation pour l’Art Contemporain Claudine et Jean-Marc Salomon; Hartfield Foundation; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; New York City Council District 34; New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; The New York Community Trust’s Edward and Sally Van Lier Fund; and William Talbott Hillman Foundation.

By visiting ISCP, you agree to abide by the following health and safety policies. Please make sure to plan ahead for your visit.

  • All visitors are encouraged to maintain social distancing while at ISCP.
  • Masks or face coverings are strongly recommended but not mandatory.
  • Hand sanitizer will be available for visitors.
  • If you have fever, chills, cough, muscle pains, headache, loss of taste or smell, or think you may have been exposed to COVID-19 prior to your visit, please contact us to reschedule.
  • An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 and other infectious conditions exists in any public space where people are present. Those visiting the International Studio & Curatorial Program voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19, other infectious conditions, and other hazards that may be present in a public space.

 

 

 

 

 

6–7pm

Exhibition
Through June 9

Clae Lu: Playroom

The International Studio & Curatorial Program presents Playroom, a solo exhibition of work by Clae Lu, recipient of The New York Community Trust’s Edward and Sally Van Lier Fund residency at ISCP, curated by Kathy Cho. Playroom presents a variety of experimental works that range from painting, to a meditative installation, to sonic compositions on the 古筝 (gu zheng), also known as the Chinese zither. All of these creative practices are meant to create space for and support the artist’s chosen families, their closely connected community.

In recent years Lu has collaborated with fellow artists in experimental music and dance performances. During their residency at ISCP, however, Lu has refocused on their individual practices, returning to mediums and themes that bring pleasure, joy, and comfort. Central to the exhibition is an installation inviting audiences to rest, reflect, and meditate to a sonic playlist created together with musician and sound artist Ben Florencio. The installation serves as an idealized architectural facsimile of the various spaces where Lu seeks out and nurtures communal kinship. A constellation of wall hanging works documents Lu’s everyday life: paintings of a family style meal and of their main instrument, the 古筝 (gu zheng). Dating as far back as 400 BCE, this traditional Chinese string instrument is usually plucked. Lu’s experimental approach to playing it is an intentional act of queering, a reclamation of how the 古筝 (gu zheng) can be understood and explored. Throughout the exhibition, Lu asks, “What does it mean to celebrate the mundane?” and “How does my community come together to create new traditions?” 

An additional public program will be announced at a later date before the exhibition closes in June.

Clae Lu (they/them) is a queer, second generation Han Chinese American from Queens, NY. They identify as an artist, designer, cultural worker, and 古筝 (gu zheng) musician working on  land that is unceded territory of the Lenni Lenape. Lu believes in the power of arts and grassroots activism to create spaces for conversation, reflection, and action. Lu has performed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; MoMA PS1; Elsewhere; Brooklyn Museum; Movement Research; Symphony Space; and Abrons Art Center. They have shown work at The W.O.W. Project, Wook + Lattuada Gallery, and the Honolulu Museum of Art. Their residency at ISCP is sponsored by The New York Community Trust’s Edward and Sally Van Lier Fund.

Kathy Cho (they/she) is a New York-based curator who produces exhibitions, events, images, and writing to collectively archive loose narratives of lived experiences. Ongoing research areas include the visual and dialogic lexicon of (Asian) diaspora artists, and the physical and digital architectures of affect. They received an MFA in Curating from Goldsmiths, University of London, and were a 2020-21 Curatorial Fellow at The Kitchen.

Clae Lu: Playroom is supported by The New York Community Trust’s Edward and Sally Van Lier Fund. Additional support is provided by Hartfield Foundation; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; New York City Council District 33; New York City Council District 34; New York State Council on the Arts and the New York State Legislature; and William Talbott Hillman Foundation.

By visiting ISCP, you agree to abide by the following health and safety policies. Please make sure to plan ahead for your visit.

  • Groups of four or more are required to schedule an appointment in advance. Please write to info@iscp-nyc.org
  • All visitors are encouraged to maintain social distancing while at ISCP.
  • Masks or face coverings are strongly recommended but not mandatory.
  • Hand sanitizer will be available for visitors.
  • If you have fever, chills, cough, muscle pains, headache, loss of taste or smell, or think you may have been exposed to COVID-19 prior to your visit, please contact us to reschedule.
  • An inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 and other infectious conditions exists in any public space where people are present. Those visiting the International Studio & Curatorial Program voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19, other infectious conditions, and other hazards that may be present in a public space.

 

 

Open Hours: Monday–Friday, 10:30am–5:30pm
Download Press Release (PDF)

Participating Residents