ISCP Talk
February 27, 2024, 6:30–7:30pm

Curators at Work: Curatorial Calibrations—Carlos Quijon, Jr. in conversation with Ahmad Fuad Osman

For this Curators at Work, ISCP curator-in-residence Carlos Quijon, Jr. will present on his curatorial practice and lead a conversation with the artist Ahmad Fuad Osman, who is the subject of a current show at ISCP curated by Quijon. On view through April 26, Ahmad Fuad Osman: Archipelagic Alchemy addresses the history of colonial empires by looking at relationships between seas and islands. 

Reflecting on the curatorial process, Quijon will begin by posing the following questions: what does curatorial work accomplish as curators move between different formats and scales? How do curators navigate the various anxieties, demands, and burdens that impact exhibition making? Quijon’s talk attempts to shed light on various calibrations of curatorial practice and the different expectations about curatorial labor and modes of working—from regional imaginations, historical speculations, an ongoing exhibition series on archipelagoes, and an upcoming national pavilion at the 2024 Venice Biennale. Quijon’s presentation will be followed by a conversation with Ahmad Fuad Osman.

Carlos Quijon, Jr. is an art historian, critic, and curator based in Manila who is currently a curator in residence at ISCP, and curator of the Philippines national pavilion at the 2024 Venice Biennale. He was a fellow of the research platform Modern Art Histories in and across Africa, South and Southeast Asia (MAHASSA). He writes for Artforum and CNN Philippines; his essays are included in SEA: Contemporary Art in Southeast Asia and Writing Presently; and his exhibitions include Courses of Action, Para Site and Goethe-Institut, Hong Kong; Minor Infelicities, Post Territory Ujeongguk, Seoul; and In Our Best Interests, NTU ADM Gallery, Singapore. 

Ahmad Fuad Osman lives and works in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. He has presented work internationally at venues including the Vargas Museum in Manila, Philippines; Kunsthal Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Sharjah Biennale, United Arab Emirates; Singapore Biennale, Singapore; The Singapore Art Museum, Singapore; Silverlens Gallery, Philippines; and Yokohama Museum of Art, Japan, among others

This program is supported by Asian Cultural Council; Hartfield Foundation; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; Brooklyn Borough President Antonio Reynoso; New York City Council District 34; New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; James Rosenquist Foundation; van Beuren Charitable Foundation; and William Talbott Hillman Foundation.
_________________

Accessibility information: Please note that the entrance to ISCP has seven steps and a ramp, which is ADA compliant. There are seven artist studios and one exhibition space which can be accessed on the first floor of ISCP. There is an accessible bathroom on the first floor at the end of the hallway, up one step, where the artist studios are located. To access the second floor there is a staircase with a grab bar installed on the right side with 22 steps. The second floor has 22 artist and curator studios, one exhibition space, and a lounge where remarks by our guest speaker will take place. To access the third floor there is a staircase with a grab bar installed on the right side with 24 steps. The third floor has five artist and curator studios. ISCP  can access a freight elevator to bring visitors between the first and second floors on request.

ISCP can offer two reserved parking spaces on request for people with disabilities. Please email Veronica Sanchez at vsanchez@iscp-nyc.org to request a parking space and/or freight elevator usage.

6:30–7:30pm

Participating Residents

Exhibition
Through June 21

Noa Yekutieli: No Longer — Not Yet

Opening Reception: Wednesday, February 21, 2024, 6–8pm

The International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP) is pleased to present Noa Yekutieli: No Longer — Not Yet, the artist’s first solo exhibition in New York, curated by Jenée-Daria Strand. Using wood, fabric, and her signature manual paper-cutting technique, Yekutieli creates striking renderings of real and imagined scenes, densely populated with sprawling flora, repeating patterns, and destroyed landscapes. For this exhibition, the artist transforms the gallery into a series of stage-like installations that relate to memory and the notion of belonging. The works reflect on cycles of destruction, loss, and trauma, themes that Yekutieli frequently contemplated while growing up in Israel and that are even more palpable for her today. In the face of the ongoing conflict and grim everyday realities of life in Israel and Palestine, she looks for, in her words, “different languages and spaces of reflection to shift patterns of violence and trauma, and oppose the idea of a singular narrative.”

Yekutieli’s family history sits at the fore of her work. In her intricate collage-like pieces, she incorporates formal strategies, craft traditions such as woodworking and sewing, and cultural symbolism inspired by her American-Japanese-Israeli heritage. Her approach to paper-cutting, for instance, is influenced by the Japanese concept of using negative space as a compositional element. Drawing on rediscovered photographs of her family, Yekutieli questions what is lost and what is left as a result of her experiences with immigration and assimilation. She embraces a state of between-ness—contending with the complexities of her multicultural intersectional identity. In each installation, she juxtaposes polarities of positive and negative, hope and reality, brutality and beauty, and destruction and growth. Much like deconstructed tapestries, thin lines of connection spill across the landscape’s chasms, creating a tension between fragility and strength. Stretching the paper compositions across the gallery’s walls, Yekutieli tests the limits of the material and creates—in scale and technique—some of her most ambitious works to date.

Noa Yekutieli is a self-taught American-Japanese-Israeli artist currently based between Los Angeles and New York. She was a resident at ISCP between the fall of 2022 and the winter of 2023. Over the past decade, her works have been featured in solo and group exhibitions worldwide, including The MAXXI – National Museum of 21st Century Art, Italy; The Nakanojo Biennale, Japan; Bienalsur Biennale at Museum of Contemporary Art of Rosario, Argentina; The Israel Museum in Jerusalem, Israel; and The Changjiang International Photography & Video Biennale at Changjiang Museum of Contemporary Art, China. Yekutieli is a recipient of grants from the Harpo Foundation, Artis, and Outset Contemporary Art Fund and is winner of the Young International Artnational Artist Award by Outset & TAAC. Her works are in the permanent collections of the Marrakech Museum for Photography and Visual Arts, Morocco; The Israel Museum and The Tel Aviv Museum of Art, both in Israel. In 2024, Yekutieli will present solo exhibitions at Hannah Traore Gallery, New York and On The Seam Museum, Israel.

Jenée-Daria Strand is a curator and writer, born and raised in Brooklyn, New York. In 2022, she was appointed as the Assis-tant Curator at Public Art Fund where she has supported the realization of new commissions by artists Fred Eversley, Huma Bhabha, Nicholas Galanin, Edra Soto, among others. Formerly, she was a Curatorial Associate at the Brooklyn Museum where she supported ten exhibitions on artists including María Magdalena Campos-Pons, Lorraine O’Grady, and Carrie Mae Weems. Strand also co-curated the museum’s presentation of Really Free: The Radical Art of Nellie Mae Rowe. She has curated independent projects for NADA Miami/TD Bank and White Columns, New York, among others, and has contribut-ed her writing to publications by the Brooklyn Museum, Studio Museum in Harlem, SEEN Journal, and more. This exhibition is supported by Artis; Hartfield Foundation; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; New York State Council on the Arts and the New York State Legislature; New York City Council District 34; James Rosenquist Foundation; van Beuren Charitable Foundation; and William Talbott Hillman Foundation.

This exhibition is supported by Artis; Hartfield Foundation; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; New York State Council on the Arts and the New York State Legislature; New York City Council District 34; James Rosenquist Foundation; van Beuren Charitable Foundation; and William Talbott Hillman Foundation.

______

Accessibility information: Please note that the entrance to ISCP has seven steps and a ramp, which is ADA compliant. There are seven artist studios and one exhibition space which can be accessed on the first floor of ISCP. There is an accessible bathroom on the first floor at the end of the hallway, up one step, where the artist studios are located. To access the second floor there is a staircase with a grab bar installed on the right side with 22 steps. The second floor has 22 artist and curator studios, one exhibition space, and a lounge where remarks by our guest speaker will take place. To access the third floor there is a staircase with a grab bar installed on the right side with 24 steps. The third floor has five artist and curator studios. ISCP  can access a freight elevator to bring visitors between the first and second floors on request.

ISCP can offer two reserved parking spaces on request for people with disabilities. Please email Veronica Sanchez at vsanchez@iscp-nyc.org to request a parking space and/or freight elevator usage.

Opening Reception: Feb 21, 2024, 6–8pm
Download Press Release (PDF)

Participating Residents